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Earlier this week, the IRS issued Notice 2019-63, which extends both: (1) the filing deadline for Forms 1095-C and 1095-B; and (2) the good-faith reporting relief.  But this year, there’s more.  In limited circumstances, the IRS will not penalize entities for the failure to furnish information to individuals using Form 1095-B, and in some cases, Form 1095-C (see discussion of Section 6055 Relief below).

 Deadline Extension

Notice 2019-63 extends the due date for reporting entities to furnish 2019 Forms 1095-C and 1095-B to individuals from January 31, 2020 to March 2, 2020.  These forms must also be filed with the IRS (along with the applicable transmittal statement) by February 28, 2020 (if filed on paper) or March 31, 2020 (if filed electronically).  Reporting entities may, however, request individual extensions to file these forms with the IRS.

Good-Faith Reporting Relief

The IRS may impose penalties of up to $270 per form for failing to furnish an accurate Form 1095-C or 1095-B to an individual and $270 per form for failing to file an accurate Form 1095-C or 1095-B with the IRS.  As in prior years, the IRS indicated in Notice 2019-63 that it would not impose these penalties for incomplete or inaccurate forms for the 2019 calendar year (due in 2020), if the reporting entity can show that it “made good-faith efforts to comply with the information-reporting requirements.”  This good-faith reporting relief does not apply to forms that were untimely furnished to individuals or filed with the IRS.

Section 6055 Relief

Under Section 6055 of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”), providers of minimum essential coverage must furnish certain information to “responsible individuals” about enrollment in the minimum essential coverage during the previous calendar year.  The purpose of this reporting requirement is to assist the IRS enforce compliance with the “individual mandate” penalty under the ACA.

Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, the individual mandate penalty was not repealed, but the penalty amount was reduced to zero.  This makes reporting under Section 6055 of the Code irrelevant.  As a result, Notice 2019-63 provides limited relief from the reporting requirements under Section 6055 of the Code.

Here is a brief summary of the Section 6055 reporting requirements:

  • Insurers. For employers that sponsor fully insured group health plans, the plan’s insurer must comply with the Section 6055 reporting requirements using Forms 1094-B and 1095-B.
  • Self-Funded Plan Sponsors. For employers that sponsor self-funded plans, the employer must comply with the Section 6055 reporting requirements. But, the applicable forms depend on whether or not the employer is an “applicable large employer” that is subject to the Employer Shared Responsibility Payment (i.e., the “pay or play” penalty):
    • Small Employers. Employers that are not subject to the pay or play penalty use Forms 1094-B and 1095-B.  (Employers that are not subject to the pay or play penalty generally don’t have enough employees to sponsor a self-funded plan.  So, it is rare for employers to file Forms 1094-B and 1095-B.)
    • Large Employers. Employers that are subject to the pay or play penalty generally use Forms 1094-C and 1095-C.  (Forms 1094-C and 1095-C allow the employer to comply with its reporting obligations under both Sections 6055 and 6056 of the Code.  Under Section 6056 of the Code, employers must report compliance with the pay or play penalty.)

Notice 2019-63 provides relief with respect to Forms 1095-B and limited relief with respect to Forms 1095-C.  For insurers and small self-funded employers, the entity must still prepare and file the Forms 1095-B with the IRS.  However, these entities are not required to furnish individuals with a copy of the Form 1095-B as long as the entity satisfies both of the following requirements:

  • The entity prominently posts a notice on its website stating that responsible individuals may receive a copy of their Form 1095-B upon request. The notice must contain both an email and a physical address that responsible individuals can use to request their Form 1095-B, and a telephone number that the responsible individual can use to contact the entity with questions.
  • The entity furnishes the responsible individual with their Form 1095-B within 30 days of the date that the entity receives the request.

Notice 2019-63 generally does not extend this relief to large self-funded employers, except for Forms 1095-C that are prepared on behalf of individuals who are not full-time employees for the entire 2019 calendar year.  A large employer sponsor of a self-funded plan may file a Form 1095-C on behalf of an individual who was enrolled in the self-funded plan during the 2019 calendar year, but was not a full-time employee during any month of the calendar year.  (For these individuals, the “all 12 months” column of line 14 is completed using the code “1G.”)  Examples of where this relief may extend to Forms 1095-C are: (1) former employees who terminated employment before 2019 but were enrolled in the self-funded plan under COBRA or retiree coverage; and (2) employees who were part-time during all of 2019, but were enrolled in the self-funded plan because the plan sponsor extended eligibility for the self-funded plan to part-time employees.

Conclusion

While the filing deadline extension and the extension of the good-faith reporting relief is likely welcome news to insurers and employers alike, it’s probably not surprising.   And, while the Section 6055 reporting relief is likely surprising, it’s probably only meaningful to insurers.

Wave of IRS Notices Slam Employers with Aggressive Penalties for Late ACA Filings

August 13 - Posted at 10:51 PM Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Since the IRS began enforcing the Affordable Care Act (ACA), it has been lenient in its enforcement of the penalties associated with the ACA particularly with regard to late and incorrect Forms 1094-C and 1095-C. This position appears to have changed with regard to the 2017 reporting season. Recently, a number of employers received a Notice 972CG from the IRS. The Notice 972CG proposes penalties under IRC section 6721 for late or incorrect filings. The focus of this is to explain the Notice 972CG and the basic steps employers who receive this letter should follow.

 Typically, the employer received a Letter 5699 inquiring why the employer had not filed the Forms 1094-C and 1095-C for the 2017 reporting season. The reasons the employer had not filed timely have varied but most employers filed the Forms 1094-C and 1095-C with the IRS well past the original due date, but well within the parameters discussed in the Letter 5699. Afterwards, these employers reported they then received a Notice 972CG from the IRS.

The Notice proposes penalties under IRC section 6721 for each late Form 1095-C filed by the employer. For the 2017 tax year, the penalty for each section 6721 violation is $260 per return. Therefore, if an employer filed 200 Forms 1095-C late, the Notice 972CG has proposed a penalty of $52,000.

The proposed penalty amounts in the Notice can be smaller than $260 per return if the employer filed the return within 30 days of the original due date (March 31 if the Forms were filed electronically not factoring in the automatic extension). If an employer filed within 30 days of the original March 31 due date, the penalty is $50 per return. If the employer’s returns were filed after 30 days of the original due date but prior to August 1 of the year in which the Forms were due, the employer’s penalty will be $100 per return. Each of these scenarios is unlikely if the employer filed after receiving the Letter 5699 as the IRS did not send these Letters out by the August 1 cutoff to allow employers to mitigate the potential penalties under section 6721.

An employer has 45 days from the date on the notice to respond to the IRS. A business operating outside of the United State has 60 days to respond to the Notice 972CG. If an employer does not respond within this time frame, the IRS will send a bill for the amount of the proposed penalty. Therefore, a timely response to the Notice 972CG is mandatory if an employer wishes to abate or eliminate the proposed penalty.

An employer has three courses of action when responding to the Notice 972CG. First, the employer could agree with the proposed penalty. If an employer agrees with the proposed penalty, box (A) should be checked and the signature and date line below box (A) should be completed. Any employer selecting this option should follow the payment instructions provided in the Notice.

Alternatively, an employer can disagree in part with the Notice’s findings or an employer can disagree with all of the Notice’s findings. If an employer disagrees in part with the Notice, the employer will check box (B). If an employer disagrees entirely with the Notice, the employer will check box (C). If box (B) or (C) are checked, the employer will be required to submit a signed statement explaining why the employer disagrees with the Notice. An employer should include any supporting documents with the signed statement. Any employer who partially disagrees with the Notice should follow the payment instructions provided in the Notice.

An employer checking box (B) or (C) in its response will have to convince the IRS that the employer’s late filing (or incorrect filing) of the Forms 1094-C and 1095-C was due to a “reasonable cause.” The Code discusses what may constitute a “reasonable cause” in exhaustive regulations that must be reviewed thoroughly before any employer responds to a Notice 972CG with box (B) or (C) checked. For an employer to establish a “reasonable cause” the employer will have to establish “significant mitigating factors” or that the “failure arose from events beyond the filer’s control.” Furthermore, to prove “reasonable cause” the employer will have to show that it acted in a “responsible manner” both before and after the failure occurred. An employer should craft its response using the template roughly outlined in the IRS regulations and Publication 1586.

Any employer who receives a Notice 972CG must take action immediately. An employer should consult an attorney or tax professional familiar with its filing process and the pertinent rules, regulations, and publications. Moving forward, it is imperative that employers file the Forms 1094-C and 1095-C in a timely, accurate fashion. 

On July 22, 2019, the IRS announced that the ACA affordability percentage for the 2020 calendar year will decrease to 9.78%. The current rate for the 2019 calendar year is 9.86%.

As a reminder, under the Affordable Care Act’s employer mandate, an applicable large employer is generally required to offer at least one health plan that provides affordable, minimum value coverage to its full-time employees (and minimum essential coverage to their dependents) or pay a penalty. For this purpose, “affordable” means the premium for self-only coverage cannot be greater than a specified percentage of the employee’s household income. Based on this recent guidance, that percentage will be 9.78% for the 2020 calendar year.

Employers now have the tools to evaluate the affordability of their plans for 2020. Unfortunately, for some employers, a reduction in the affordability percentage will mean that they will have to reduce what employees pay for employee only coverage, if they want their plans to be affordable in 2020.

For example, in 2019 an employer using the hourly rate of pay safe harbor to determine affordability can charge an employee earning $12 per hour up to $153.81 ($12 X 130= 1560 X 9.86%) per month for employee-only coverage. However in 2020, that same employer can only charge an employee earning $12 per hour $152.56 ($12 X 130= 1560 X 9.78%) per month for employee-only coverage, and still use that safe harbor. A reduction in the affordability percentage presents challenges especially for plans with non-calendar year renewals, as those employers that are subject to the ACA employer mandate may need to change their contribution percentage in the middle of their benefit plan year to meet the new affordability percentage. For this reason, we recommend that employers re-evaluate what changes, if any, they should make to their employee contributions to ensure their plans remain affordable under the ACA.

As we have written about previously, employers will sometimes use the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) safe harbor to determine affordability. While we won’t know the 2020 FPL until sometime in early 2020, employers are allowed to use the FPL in effect at least six months before the beginning of their plan year. This means employers can use the 2019 FPL number as a benchmark for determining affordability for 2020 now that they know what the affordability percentage is for 2020.

New Year Brings Hospital Pricing Transparency

February 01 - Posted at 1:00 PM Tagged: , , ,

As has been reported in various news outlets, new rules issued last year now require hospitals to post their standard charges for various services on their websites. This is part of a move toward greater hospital pricing transparency in the health care provider market. The requirement to post these amounts comes from the Affordable Care Act.

However, the posted prices are likely to be of limited use. First, the amounts on their websites are the “full price” amounts, sometimes referred to as “rack rates” or the “chargemaster”, but almost no one actually pays these prices. Insurance companies and third-party administrators negotiate discounts off of these prices. Furthermore, consumers who are covered by insurance may only pay a portion of these rates through copayments or coinsurance. Even uninsured consumers may negotiate discounts off of these prices.

In many cases, the items or services listed on their websites are given highly technical, often confusing names. Even an experienced health care professional may have trouble understanding them. Additionally, a single hospital procedure may involve multiple services and therefore include several listed amounts, so the total charge for a procedure or visit may require some sleuthing around on the website to figure it out.

The Takeaway

It seems unlikely that most employees will get much use out of these posted hospital prices. However, to the extent employers receive questions from their employees, the employers should be prepared to respond. Specifically, employers should point out that the charges on the website do not reflect the discounts negotiated by their insurance carrier or TPA.

If an employee wants to know what he or she will be charged for an item or service, the employer should suggest that they contact the carrier with their questions. Many carriers are also offering price transparency tools that reflect the discounts of the employer’s plan. If those tools are available, the employer may want to mention that as well.

IRS Announces Filing Extension for 2018 Forms 1095-B and 1095-C and Continued Good Faith Transition Relief

December 03 - Posted at 6:48 PM Tagged: , , , , , , , ,
Late last week, the IRS announced it was extending the deadline for getting Forms 1095-B and 1095-C to employees from January 31, 2019 to  March 4, 2019. Despite the extension, the IRS encourage employers to furnish the form as as possible.

The extension to provide employees with a copy of Form 1095-B and 1095-C DOES NOT extend the due date for employer, insurers, and other providers to file the 2018 forms with the IRS. The filing due date for these forms remains February 28, 2019 (or April 1, 2019 if filing electronically), unless the IRS announces they will extend the filing due date. 

In Notice 2018-94 released by the IRS, they reveled that while failure to furnish and file the Form timely may subject employers to penalties, they should still attempt to furnish and file even after the applicable due date as the IRS will take this action into consideration when determining if penalties will be assessed. 

Good faith reporting standards will apply once again for 2018 reporting. This means that reporting entities will not be subject to reporting penalties for incorrect or incomplete information if they can show that they have made good faith efforts to comply with the 2018 Form 1094 and 1095 requirements. This relief applies to missing and incorrect taxpayer identification numbers and dates of birth as well as other required return information. No relief is provided, however, where there has not been a good faith effort to comply with the reporting requirements.

Reminders for 2018 Annual Reporting of Health Coverage

November 02 - Posted at 3:00 PM Tagged: , , , , , , ,

The IRS recently released final forms and instructions for the 2018 employer reporting. The good news is that the process and instructions have not changed significantly from last year. However, the IRS has started to assess penalties on the 2015 forms. For that reason, employers should make sure they complete the forms accurately.

The final 2018 forms and instructions can be found at:


Employers with self-funded plans can use the B forms to report coverage for anyone their plan covers who is not an employee at any point during the year. The due dates for 2018 are as follows:

  • Individual statement (1095 C), due to employees January 31, 2019
  • Employer transmittal (1094 C and copies of each 1095 C), due to IRS by February 28, 2019 (paper) OR April 1, 2019 (electronically)

Be sure to file these forms on time. The IRS will assess late filing penalties if you file them after they are due. The instructions explain how to apply for extensions if you think you may miss the deadlines.

The 1095 C form can be sent to employees electronically with the employee’s consent, but that consent must meet specific requirements. The consent criteria include disclosing the necessary hardware and software requirements, the right to request a paper copy, and how to withdraw consent. They are the same consent requirements that apply to the W-2.

Employers must submit the forms electronically if they file 250 or more 1095 Cs. The instructions explain how to request a waiver of the electronic filing requirement.

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Proposal Announced To Expand Access to Affordable Health Coverage

October 23 - Posted at 7:21 PM Tagged: , , , , , , , , ,

The Trump administration announced a proposed rule today that would allow businesses to give employees money to purchase health insurance on the individual marketplace, a move senior officials say will expand choices for employees that work at small businesses.

The proposed rule, issued by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Department of Labor (DOL) and the Department of Treasury, would restructure Obama-era regulations that limited the use of employer-funded accounts known as health reimbursement arrangements (HRA). The proposal is part of President Donald Trump’s “Promoting Healthcare Choice and Competition” executive order issued last year, which tasked the agencies with expanding the use of HRAs.

Senior administration officials said the proposed change would bring more competition to the individual marketplace by giving employees the chance to purchase health coverage on their own. The rule includes “carefully constructed guardrails” to prevent employers from keeping healthy employees on their company plans and incentivizing high-cost employees to seek coverage elsewhere.

That issue was a primary concern under the Obama administration, which barred the use of HRAs for premium assistance. The 21st Century Cures Act established Qualified Small Employer Health Reimbursement Accounts (QSEHRA), but those are subject to stringent limitations.

Under the new rule, HRA money would remain exempt from federal and payroll income taxes for employers and employees. Additionally, employers with traditional coverage would be permitted to reserve $1,800 for supplemental benefits like vision, dental and short-term health plans.

Officials estimate 10 million people would purchase insurance through HRAs, including 1 million people that were not previously insured. Most of those people would be concentrated in small and mid-sized businesses.

The proposed change would “unleash consumerism” and “spur innovation among providers and insurers that directly compete for consumer dollars,” one senior official said. Officials expect 7 million people will be added to the individual marketplace over the next 10 years.

The rule does not change the Affordable Care Act’s employer mandate, which requires employers with 50 or more employees to offer coverage to 95% of full-time employees. Administration officials expect the proposal will have the biggest impact on small businesses with less than 50 employees.

However, the rule could scale back the use of premium subsidies. If the HRA is considered “affordable” based on the amount provided by the employer, the employee would not be eligible for a premium tax credit. If the HRA fails to meet those minimum requirements, the employee could choose between a premium tax credit and the HRA.

Overall, the rule will “create a greater degree of value in healthcare and the health benefits marketplace than we would otherwise see,” one official said.

The regulation, if finalized, is proposed to be effective for plan years beginning on and after January 1, 2020.

 

Association Health Plan Final Rule May Bring New Coverage Options for Small Businesses and Self-Employed

June 28 - Posted at 3:00 PM Tagged: , , , , , , , , , ,

On June 19, 2018, the Trump administration took the first step in a three-part effort to expand affordable health plan options for consumers when the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) finalized a proposed rule designed to make it easier for a group of employers to form and offer association health plans (AHP). A final rule relaxing rules around short-term, limited duration insurance and a proposed rule addressing health reimbursement arrangements are expected in the upcoming months. In cementing proposed changes to its January 2018 proposed rule, “Definition of ‘Employer’ Under Section 3(5) of ERISA — Association Health Plans,” the administration seeks to broaden health options for individuals who are self-employed or employed by smaller businesses. The final rule will be applicable in three phases starting on September 1, 2018. 

Overview of AHP Final Rule

Under the rule, it will be substantially easier for a group of employers tied by a “commonality of interest” to form a bona fide association capable of offering a single multi-employer benefit plan under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). The rule outlines two primary bases for establishing this “commonality of interest”: (1) having a principal place of business in the same region (e.g., a state or metropolitan area), or (2) operating in the same industry, trade, line of business or profession. An association also may establish additional membership criteria enabling entities with a sufficient “commonality of interest” to participate in the AHP, such as being minority-owned or sharing a common moral or religious conviction, so long as the criteria are not a subterfuge for discrimination based on a health factor. Further, the final rule clarifies how the association must be governed and controlled by its employer-members in order to be considered a bona fide association capable of offering a single-employer health benefit plan.

Meeting the criteria for a bona fide group or association of employers in the final rule allows the AHP to be treated as a single-employer ERISA plan. Thus, assuming the association is comprised of employer-members with more than 50 total full-time employees, it will be considered a large group and exempt from key Affordable Care Act (ACA) market reforms, such as the essential health benefits requirements and modified community rating rules, that would otherwise apply to a health plan offered by any of its individual employer-members with less than 50 full-time employees. This is important because the ACA applies certain requirements only to small group (and individual) health insurance products and not to large group plans.
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PCORI Fee Payment Due July 31st

June 05 - Posted at 2:00 PM Tagged: , , , , , , , , ,

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) created PCORI to help patients, clinicians, payers and the public make informed health decisions by advancing comparative effectiveness research. PCORI’s research is to be funded, in part, by fees paid by either health insurers or sponsors of self-insured health plans. These fees are widely known as PCORI fees. Health insurers and self-insured plan sponsors are required to report and pay PCORI fees annually using IRS Form 720 (Quarterly Federal Excise Tax Return). The report and fees are due on July 31st with respect to the plan year that ended during the preceding calendar year. For instance, for calendar year plans, the fee that is due July 31, 2018 applies to the plan year that ended December 31, 2017.

Reporting PCORI fees on Form 720

Form 720 and completion instructions are posted on the IRS’ website. Insurers and self-insured plan sponsors must report the average number of lives covered under the plan. For fully insured plans, the carrier is responsible for reporting and paying the fee on the employers behalf. For a self-insured plan, the plan sponsor (employer) enters information for “self-insured health plans.” The number of covered lives is then multiplied by the applicable rate based on the plan year end date. Form 720 that is due July 31, 2018, will reflect payment for plan years ending in 2017. The applicable rate depends on the plan year end date:

  • $2.26 for plan years ending between January 1, 2017 and September 30, 2017
  • $2.39 for plan years ending between October 1, 2017 and December 31, 2017

The applicable rate may increase for inflation in future years. However, the program ends in 2019 and PCORI fees will not apply for plan years ending after September 30, 2019. Insurers or self-insured plan sponsors that file Form 720 only for the purpose of reporting PCORI fees do not need to file Form 720 for the first, third or fourth quarter of the year. Insurers or self-insured plan sponsors that file Form 720 to report quarterly excise tax liability (for example, to report the foreign insurance tax) should enter a PCORI fee amount only on the second quarter filing. See below for more information about affected plans and methods for calculating the number of participants and amount of the required PCORI fee.
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IRS Clarifies “Letter 227” & Releases Sample Letters

June 01 - Posted at 4:37 PM Tagged: , , , , , , , ,

The IRS has created a webpage on understanding Letter 227, which certain applicable large employers (ALEs) may receive in connection with the assessment of employer shared responsibility penalties (aka Pay or Play penalties). As background, the IRS uses Letter 226J to notify an ALE of a proposed penalty assessment. ALEs have 30 days to respond, using Form 14764 to indicate their agreement or disagreement with the proposed penalty amount. Letter 227 acknowledges the ALE’s response to Letter 226J and explains the outcome of the IRS’s review and the next steps to fully resolve the penalty assessment. There are five different versions of the letter (samples are provided of each version on the IRS website):

  • Letter 227-J states that the proposed penalty amount will be assessed because the ALE agreed with the proposed penalty. No response is required to this version of the letter, and the case is deemed closed.
  • Letter 227-K shows that the penalty amount has been reduced to zero. No response is required to this version of the letter, and the case is deemed closed.
  • Letter 227-L shows that the proposed penalty amount has been revised. This version of the letter includes an updated Form 14765 (PTC listing) and revised calculation table. The ALE can agree with the revised penalty amount, request a meeting with the IRS, or appeal the determination.
  • Letter 227-M shows that the penalty amount did not change. This version of the letter also includes an updated Form 14765 (PTC listing) and revised calculation table to the extent any data used in the computation of the proposed penalty amount changed based on information provided by the ALE. The ALE can agree with the revised penalty amount, request a meeting with the IRS, or appeal the determination.
  • Letter 227-N acknowledges the decision reached by the IRS appeals office and shows the resulting penalty amount. No response is required to this version of the letter, and the case is deemed closed.

Only Letters 227-L and 227-M call for a response, which must be provided by the date stated in the letter. The IRS stresses that the Letter 227 is not a bill. Notice CP 220J is used to collect the employer shared responsibility penalty payment.

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